Browsing Tag: Honeywell

The star of the MEBAA static display, Honeywell’s flying testbed Boeing 757 N757HW – Photo: Jacob Pfleger | AirlineReporter

As part of this years Middle East Business Aviation Association (MEBAA) show at Dubai-Al Maktoum Airport (DWC), there were over 45 aircraft on static display. Of course, there were countless VIP Boeing and Airbus jets there, however for me the highlight was the Honeywell Boeing 757-200 flying testbed. The aircraft has a rather interesting history; it started out life with Eastern Airlines in 1983 before operating for a British leisure airline from 1995-2002, before finally coming to Honeywell in 2005 after a few years in storage. As of 2008, the aircraft has completed over 400 test flights and some 1,700 flight hours in over 15 countries. That’s impressive.

This is no ordinary 757 – Photo: Jacob Pfleger | AirlineReporter

The most distinguishing feature of the aircraft is the engine mount on the forward right-hand section of the fuselage. The mount is primarily used for in-flight testing of new engines — mainly for the corporate jet market. The most notable engines that were tested and certified on the aircraft include the HTF7000 and TFE731 engines, which power the Learjet aircraft series.

Honeywell's Boeing 757 sits at Paine Field

Honeywell’s Boeing 757 sits at Paine Field

Honeywell recently reached out and let me know that their Boeing 757 would be parked at Paine Field (north of Seattle) overnight. They asked if I’d like to take a tour before it departed back to Phoenix. Um… yes please!

The third engine on the side of the 757

The third engine on the side of the 757, with a B-52 in the background

The rain partly cleared as I arrived and the first obvious difference between Honeywell’s 757 and the run-of-the-mill 757 is the third engine on the side of the fuselage. The engine mount is used to test different Honeywell engines in the “real world.” During my tour, the Honeywell TFE731 engine was hooked up and it was being tested for vibration issues.

N580HW, Honeywell Aero's CV-580. Photo Credit: JL Johnson | Airline Reporter

N580HW, Honeywell Aero’s CV-580 – Photo: JL Johnson | AirlineReporter

Late last month I had the opportunity to attend Honeywell Aero’s International Media Event in Phoenix, AZ. The  symposium focused on all things Honeywell and AvGeek, with a small and diverse audience of mainstream media and bloggers from all across the world.

Prior to the event, I understood that Honeywell was, like many other conglomerates, well-established in the aviation industry. Indeed, we’ve written extensively about how Honeywell improves aviation safety, we have geeked out over their incredibly diverse fleet of test aircraft and, of course, have covered their innovative and (can we say exciting? Because it is!) Electric Green Taxi System, EGTS.

Honeywell aerospace's SkyHarbor Facility- Phoenix, AZ. Image courtesy Honeywell

Honeywell Aerospace’s Sky Harbor Facility in Phoenix – Photo: Honeywell

But even with this coverage, we’d only begun to scratch the surface of Honeywell’s Aerospace operations.  In just shy of two days, with their incredibly passionate crew, I learned more about the company and their products than I had over a lifetime of being an aviation enthusiast.

Honeywell Aerospace has a beautiful property. Photo -  Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter.com

Honeywell Aerospace has a beautiful property – Photo: Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter

After experiencing what it was like to fly on the Gulfstream G650, it was time to explore the engineering advancements Honeywell was developing at their Deer Valley lab.

What I was shown would put aviators that finished their careers even fifteen years ago in absolute awe.

Honeywell has a four-step approach to designing cockpit avionics:

  • Give the pilot what they need
  • Give the pilot only what they need
  • Give the pilot the information only when they need it
  • Give them the information in a way that is intuitive, unambiguous, and easy to understand
Primus Epic, called PlaneView on Gulfstreams is the current state of the art flight deck. Photo - Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter.com

Primus Epic, called PlaneView on Gulfstreams is the current state-of-the-art-flight-deck – Photo: Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter

The Primus Epic system on the G650 was designed with those four principles in mind. The positive response from flight crews has been overwhelming. Clearly the real-world use is matching up with the testing. This positive response has allowed Honeywell to go even further in their exploration of pilot-aircraft interface.