Browsing Tag: Delta Air Lines

Delta Airbus A330neo

I am pretty sure that there is more to the A330neo than just those raccoon eyes!

Timing can be a magical thing. I was just talking to my pal Jason Rabinowitz about airplanes (we do this often) and I was asking why the Airbus A330neo was such a big deal. I actually tracked down our high-end chat:

Me: “Why do we care so much about the A330neo? Just b/c that is all we have right now to celebrate?”
Jason: “It new. And it all we got.”

Some eye candy to get you to keep reading and/or looking at the pics.

Some eye candy to get you to keep reading and/or looking at the pics

Don’t get me wrong. I have still been excited watching the new A330 go into service, but it doesn’t match the excitement of the 787 Dreamliner, 747 Intercontinental, or A350 XWB.

The day after my award-winning chat with Jason, I received an invite from Delta Air Lines to come check out one of their new Airbus A330-900neos at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA). Perfect.

WestJet 737-600 pushing back at YVR

In the midst of a major expansion, WestJet looks to grow its partnership with Delta Air Lines – Photo: John Jamieson

On December 6th, 2017, WestJet and Delta announced they would be expanding their partnership into a cross-border joint venture. The agreement, which should be finalized later this year, signifies WestJet’s arrival on the global stage. Once a Southwest lookalike, WestJet has become a hybrid carrier capable of challenging Air Canada.

Their success may have come at a price. Over the past few years, WestJet increased their operational costs and complexity in pursuing Air Canada. On the heels of their first quarterly loss in 13 years, WestJet is hoping 2019 brings clearer skies. However, with complicated labor contracts to sort out, the airline seems to be heading for more turbulence. Their joint venture with Delta could be the key to regaining some lost momentum.

Before I delve into the complexities of the airlines’ joint venture, it’s worth understanding how far WestJet has come in its 22 years.

RDU’s stunning Terminal 2 ticketing area – Photo: RDU Airport Authority

Two cities on either side of the country have become the epicenter of a battle royale that would make wrestling promoter Vince McMahon proud. Put on your best ring announcing voice and proclaim this the “Battle of SEA and RDU!” (rolls off the tongue better than “Seattle-Tacoma International Airport versus Raleigh–Durham International Airport)

Through a TV news and PR career, I’ve lived in some cities I would have never imagined, including six years in Raleigh, NC (2001 to 2007). Back then, American Airlines dominated with regional jet service to smaller cities and big planes to major hubs of Chicago, Dallas, Miami, and New York.

Delta mainly flew to Atlanta and Cincinnati. You also had the option of Northwest Airlines to its hub cities of Memphis, Minneapolis, and Detroit. One city not on the list back then was Seattle. I flew out to the Emerald City in 2005 to see my Minnesota Twins in the baseball opener via a connection in Minneapolis on Northwest.

What a difference a decade makes. Thanks to increased competition and more nonstop flights to cities that were once ignored by the airlines, the consumer has more choices than ever as Seattle and Raleigh, NC have two nonstop flights that started within the past two years. RDU also has a stunning updated terminal that makes Sea-Tac’s 1970’s airport look even worse than its brown facade and cramped restrooms seem.

Alaska was first with nonstop Seattle to Charleston, SC and Raleigh, NC flights. It was a roll of the dice for Alaska, who does not have much brand recognition east of the Mississippi. The Charleston flight was literally a gift to Boeing, since so many of its employees shuttle between the two cities (due to their 787 factory there). Raleigh has a big tech and pharmaceutical community, so the airlines are banking on that business.

Alaska says the risk is worth the reward.

“We are all about providing nonstop access to destinations like Charleston and Raleigh making travel convenient and efficient for our guests,” Alaska spokesperson Ann Johnson tells AirlineReporter. “Since we started service in Charleston and RDU, we have increased it based on the demand. We have increased the number of days of week that we operate the Charleston service. At RDU we launched a second destination to SFO last year. Alaska offers the most nonstop service out of Seattle to top destinations.”

Delta did not respond for comment on this story.

I had a personal flight recently on Delta (I paid for and did not receive any perks for doing this story) and thought why not break down the service.

A Delta A350 departs DTW, Delta's primary airport for the plane type. - Photo: © Andrew Poure

A Delta A350 departs DTW, Delta’s primary airport for the plane type – Photo: © Andrew Poure

If you’re like me, you’ve been biding your time waiting for the perfect opportunity to fly the Airbus A350. AirlineReporter is written for AvGeeks, by AvGeeks, after all. With United continually deferring deliveries, and American’s recent Dreamliner-over-A350 switcheroo, I must confess, I didn’t have high hopes for checking this long-sought line item off of my increasingly more lengthy to-do list anytime soon. Enter the Delta A350 and the need to re-position a brand-new flagship from one hub to another. Click through, friends, you’ll want to be on this flight.