Browsing Tag: Boeing Factory

The past and future meet. The stairs has an old 737 livery, compared to the MAX's new livery

The past and future meet – the old 737 livery on the stairs and the the MAX’s new livery on the jet

This week, Boeing took the time to not only show off their improved production line for the 737 MAX, but also the first (and second) aircraft. Over two days, AirlineReporter visited Boeing’s 737’s factory in Renton, Wa to learn more about the 737 MAX and how Boeing will go about producing them.

The MAX is the fourth generation of the venerable 737 and will replace the 737 Next Generation (or 737 NG). The first 737 first flew in April 1967 and, although it might have the same name and a similar appearance, the aircraft has changed dramatically over the years.

The MAX will come in three main flavors: the MAX 7, MAX 8, and (wait for it) MAX 9. I have to say that it’s a bit weird to have the “MAX” [aka maximum] with a 7, but then also an 8 and 9? Oh well.

Boeing's new Advanced Technology winglets are a distinctive feature of the 737 MAX.

Boeing’s new Advanced Technology winglets are a distinctive feature of the 737 MAX.

The number of passengers in each respective version of the aircraft will be similar to the 737 NGs. The MAX 7 will carry 126 to 149 passengers, the MAX 8 will carry 162 to 200 (with the MAX 200 for Ryanair), and the MAX 9 will have 180 to 220. These changes are taking the 737 frame, technology, and cost savings… well… to the MAX!

The money shot: 747 line inside the Boeing factory

The money shot: 747 line inside the Boeing factory

Back in the 1960s Boeing made a big gamble. They decided to build the world’s largest airliner, the Boeing 747 Jumbo Jet. To build such a beast, they would need a large facility. After careful consideration, Boeing decided to build a large factory in Everett.

Since the first 747 rolled off the line in 1968, every other 747 has been built under the same roof. Even today, the 747-8 is built in the same factory.

In case you didn't know the aircraft type, there is a large sign on the wall.

In case you didn’t know the aircraft type, there is a large sign on the wall.

Although Boeing offers public tours of the facility, they do not allow cameras. I was lucky enough to participate in a media event and take photos of the 747 line in the factory and I wanted to be able to share. Enjoy…

A group of AvGeeks in front of a Boeing 747-8I - Photo: The Boeing Company

A group of AvGeeks in front of a Boeing 747-8I – Photo: The Boeing Company

What a ride! This year’s Aviation Geek Fest Seattle was bigger and better than ever.

I have to say that I am very honored by the fact that I get flown around the world to do some pretty amazing aviation-related things, but Aviation Geek Fest has become one of my favorites to look forward to each year. I am just so happy I got to share the experience with 300 AvGeeks!

AGF14

Boeing SST Mock up in the Museum of Flight Restoration Center

Boeing SST mockup in the Museum of Flight Restoration Center

SATURDAY: PAINE FIELD DAY

For me, the first day (Saturday the 15th) started with a trip to the Museum of Flight Restoration Center where I was able to check out the Boeing SST mockup, a Comet, the first-ever Boeing 727, and a Boeing 247.

BONUS: An Inside Look How the Museum of Flight Restores Their Aircraft

I just love the feel of this facility; it is raw. Although there were many cool ongoing projects, the best part was talking to the folks doing the restoration. They love what they do, they have a sense of humor, and they have so much amazing background on the planes.

American Airline's sixth Boeing 777-300ER, sitting at Boeing Field. Photo by Brandon Farris.

American Airline’s sixth Boeing 777-300ER, sitting at Boeing Field. Photo by Brandon Farris.

I recently had the opportunity to hang out with American Airlines while the carrier and Boeing enjoyed some festivities prior to the airline taking delivery of its sixth 777-300ER (77W) on April 11th.

Everything began early in the morning with a short drive from the Crowne Plaza Hotel in downtown Seattle to Renton, home of the Boeing 737 final assembly lines. Although we were set to fly the 777, American had recently placed a large order for the 737 NG and MAX.