Browsing Tag: #ANASJC

The ANA Business Staggered Seat.  This is the "C" seat with the storage window side giving true Aisle access.  Chose "A" if you love a true window seat - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

The ANA Business Staggered Seat. This is the “C” seat with the storage window side giving true Aisle access. Chose “A” if you love a true window seat.

During my ANA Ambassador trip, I was given the chance to fly three different types of All Nippon Airways (ANA) Business Class seats and I wanted to share my thoughts on them. For my story, I will be concentrating mostly on the hard product (the seat) vs the “soft” product (meals, service, amenities), which is common across all the aircraft.

The current generation of Business Class seats are fitted to ANA’s 787 as part of the Inspiration of Japan series. There are two different versions: international and domestic. The long haul (international) 787 seats are called “Business Staggered” and are similar to a small pod. This is currently the airline’s premium product. The seats lie fully flat and, with a length of over 6ft, allows passengers to easily get some rest. The Business Staggered seats can also be found in some of ANA’s 777s (though the 777 version is slightly larger).

I woke up to this every morning.  Looking out over The Avenue of Stars and Victoria Harbour to Hong Kong Island from the Peninsula Hotel - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

I woke up to this every morning. Looking out over The Avenue of Stars and Victoria Harbour to Hong Kong Island from the Peninsula Hotel – Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

This is the continuation of a multi-part series covering my trip from Seattle to San Jose to Narita to Hong Kong and back as a ANA Ambassador. My flight was provided by ANA, but all opinions are my own. Part1: San Jose to Tokyo on the 787 Dreamliner – Part2: Connecting in Tokyo’s Narita Airport – Part3: Tokyo to Hong Kong & Back Again – Part4: A Helicopter Flightseeing Tour of Hong Kong.

What happens when you send two AvGeeks halfway around the world to Hong Kong and let them stay at one of the top hotels for three nights?  A good amount of luxurious shenanigans, of course!

Jason Rabinowitz and I recently had the opportunity to do just that and I wanted to share our experiences, especially related to the Peninsula Hotel Hong Kong. The experience and service began the moment we stepped off our flight.  We were barely out of the jet bridge and there was someone to escort us through the formalities of immigration, customs and baggage.

Once we got land-side at Hong Kong International Airport, the real adventure began.  We were escorted to the “Limousine Lounge” where our ride to the hotel was waiting.  What was waiting for us was most certainly a first for me.

The China Clipper Lounge Logo and a replica Martin MB-130 Flying Boat - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

The China Clipper Lounge Logo and a replica Martin MB-130 Flying Boat – Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

In 1928 the Kadoorie family opened the Peninsula Hong Kong at a time when the skies were dominated by flying boats.  Qantas, BOAC & Imperial Airways all flew the Empire Flying Boats, however it was Pan American Airways System (what Pan Am was originally known as) who pioneered the use of flying boats with their Clippers.

The first flying boat for Pan Am was the “China Clipper” and it flew its first commercial flight from San Francisco to Manila in the Philippines.  In 1936 the first Clipper (named Philippine Clipper) touched down in Victoria Harbor just off Kai Tak with Juan Trippe, President of Pan American, on-board.  That night as Juan Trippe stayed as a guest at the Peninsula, little would he know that 58 years later (1994) a tribute to the very aircraft he arrived on, would open in that same hotel.

Our ride today  is an Aerospatiale AS355N Twin Squirrel - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

My ride was an Aerospatiale AS355N Twin Squirrel [B-KHS] – Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

This is the continuation of a multi-part series covering my trip from Seattle to San Jose to Narita to Hong Kong and back as a ANA Ambassador. The helicopter flight was provided by the Peninsula Hong Kong although all views are my own. Part1: San Jose to Tokyo on the 787 Dreamliner – Part2: Connecting in Tokyo’s Narita Airport – Part3: Tokyo to Hong Kong & Back. Again

Hong Kong is made up of over 421 square miles of land & water and is home to almost 7 million people.  The two main islands that make up this Special Administrative Region (SAR) of China are Hong Kong Island (where the city gets its name) and also Kowloon.  With ground space being so sparce, the city has been built up into the sky and what better way to see this amazing city than from the air in a helicopter?

The Peninsula is the only hotel in Hong Kong with it’s own roof top helipad — actually it has two!  Both rated to 3 tonnes, these twin roof top pads are the home base to Heliservices Hong Kong’s Aerospatiale AS355N Twin Squirrel.  This small, versatile helicopter can speed you between Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) and the hotel in just 10 minutes or taking you on a cruise over the city and surrounding islands.