This An-30 belongs to Aviakompany Grodno. They’re based in Grodno. Creative name… – Photo: Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter

The Antonov An-24 is one versatile aircraft. That aircraft lead to the An-26, which then lead to  the An-32. Heck, the Saudis gave the Ukrainian government money to design the An-132. Reasons were given for the latter, I am sure.

There’s the view! – Photo: Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter

All of those just haul people or cargo, though. BORING! What if you needed to observe something? What if you needed airborne survey? What if you wanted to do better cartography? Enter the rarest An-24 variant: the An-30 — only 123 were ever made.

It’s distinct from all the other An-24s in the world because, well… just look at it. The glazed nose for the navigator really sticks out and illustrates the fact that this is a rare breed of Antonov. It does more than look cool, though.

Peaceful protestors at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport after the executive order – Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | JDLMultimedia

Capping off a tumultuous first week in office, President Donald Trump issued an executive order on Friday that — without warning — closed America’s gates to immigrants, refugees, and visitors from seven Muslim-majority countries. The order invited swift reactions across the U.S. and around the world. It also threw the aviation world into disarray. Individuals were held at airports without access to legal counsel, and airlines struggled to understand the executive order’s harsh ramifications. Airline crews even had to be adjusted in some cases.

AirlineReporter usually doesn’t venture too far into the world of politics, but given that this executive order has huge implications for air travelers around the world, we wanted to share some thoughts. Read on for an overview of the new policy, its impact on travelers over the weekend and beyond, and what we think it means for the spirit of air travel. (Spoiler alert: it’s not looking good)

A fine tribute to C-3PO – Image: ANA

It’s about time that Anakin’s robotic masterwork got some love.

ANA has done a series of fantastic special liveries for their partnership with Disney to promote the Star Wars franchise. Starting with the R2-D2 themed 787-9 that rolled out factory fresh, they moved on to a BB-8 themed 777-381/ER, and finally a combination of Astromech droids emblazoned on a 2002-vintage 767-381/ER.

The first flight of this scheme emblazoned aboard JA743A will be from Haneda to Kagoshima on March 21. From there it will work its way around the Japanese sky. Remember, at ANA the 777-200 is a purely domestic bird.

The final RAM 787 sits at the Everett Delivery Center - Photo: Jason Rabinowitz

The final RAM 787 sits at the Everett Delivery Center – Photo: Jason Rabinowitz

Years before the first iPhone went on sale, before Facebook knew everything about everyone, and even before this very blog, Royal Air Maroc placed an order for four Boeing 787 Dreamliners, with an option for an one more. The year was 2005, and the recently revealed 787 was picking up orders left and right.

Two RAM 787s seen at Paine Field in Oct 2010 with no plans to be delivered any time soon.

Two RAM 787s seen at Paine Field in Oct 2010 with no plans to be delivered any time soon

I won’t get into a history lesson about the 787 program delays since you can find that elsewhere, but let’s just say that RAM didn’t receive its first 787 from Boeing in late 2008 as originally planned. It wasn’t until 2014 that RAM would see its first 787, a full nine years after originally placing the order. Finally in late 2016, over a decade after the initial order was placed, Boeing completed delivery of all five of its 787s.