Yup... this IS your grandpa's airline - Photo: David Parker Brown

Yup… this IS your grandpa’s airline – Photo: David Parker Brown | AirlineReporter

From time-to-time, my mom will forward me airline stories; it is kind of nice. Recently, she pointed out a new airline named Joon, which is being marketed to millennials. See, she likes to poke fun since I am right on the cusp of being a millennial. Some say that being born in 1980 makes you one, while others debate the exact year. I say that I am NOT a millennial and get insulted being called one. I am a unique indivdual and cannot be easily placed into just one convenient definition. Wait. Damn it.

Quickly reading over Joon’s press release, it seemed to use lots of fancy words, but didn’t provide much actual substance or new ideas. It did, however, make me roll my eyes… hard. Just a taste of the press release:

“Joon is aimed at a young working clientele, the millennials (18 to 35-year-olds), whose lifestyles revolve around digital technology. This new brand has been entirely designed to meet their requirements and aspirations, with an authentic and connected offering that stands out in the world of air transport.”

“Joon will not be a low-cost airline as it will offer original products and services that reflect those of Air France. Joon is a lifestyle brand and a state of mind. Short, punchy and international, the name Joon is designed to address a worldwide audience.”

My head hurts. And that livery. And it is not even a low-cost airline. I just need to breathe… I don’t want to get carried away here complaining about this concept — not what this story is for. (Read a bit more about Joon, on Ben Schlappig’s OneMileataTime).

Anyhow, my mom and I got to thinking. If we are seeing more airlines marketed towards the younger folks, why doesn’t an airline market to her generation: the Baby Boomers? The conversation got fun and I think we came up with some pretty good ideas on what some Baby Boomers might want from an airline. I decided (with her permission) to share. Here is our airline…

Is air travel not whimsical enough for you? Does the inflight experience on most airlines not appeal enough to your inner preteen self? Well, we have good news for you! Taiwan-based EVA Air has what you need: a truly one-of-a-kind Hello Kitty themed service on select routes that will make any other flight seem boring by comparison.

Hello Kitty aside, I’ve wanted to travel EVA Air for a long time. Its Royal Laurel premium cabin is a favorite among the AvGeek elite for its excellent seat and service. Plus, EVA Air is part of the pantheon of elite Skytrax Five-Star airlines. So I included an EVA flight from Paris to Taipei in a recent Star Alliance multi-airline itinerary.

I wasn’t initially aware that my flight was a Hello Kitty service, but when I found out, I was thrilled! Not because I’m much of a Hello Kitty fan (though would I admit it if I was?). More because these Hello Kitty flights are an iconic AvGeek experience and a rare find.

Read on for photos and tales from my trip with Hello Kitty … *ahem* I mean Captain Hello Kitty.

The Hello Kitty Shining Star Jet, which is currently flying from ORD-TPE as BR55!

The beautiful terminal at Singapore Changi Airport – Photo: Blaine Nickeson | AirlineReporter

I recently needed to travel between Singapore and Hong Kong while on vacation. There are a lot of options for airlines and equipment for that four-hour flight. I had done the opposite route on the way there in Cathay Pacific business class on an A330.  Since I’d never had the opportunity to fly Singapore Airlines (SQ), despite the rave reviews, I decided to transfer points from my Chase account to my SQ KrisFlyer account to redeem for first class.  I figured the flight, while not long-haul, was long enough to get to experience the airline.

This article will focus on the ground experience at the excellent Singapore Changi Airport, which many consider to be the best airport in the world. I can see why.

We arrived at the terminal via the MRT train. Given the chance again, I would have just caught a cab or an Uber, since it was nowhere as convenient and timely as, say, the Hong Kong airport express train. Also, when you arrive via car, you can be dropped off in the driveway of the private First Class check-in area. Instead, we had to wander through the terminal to find it – luckily my wife has become more patient with these types of adventures. 

The artsiest window seat picture I’ve got (admit it, we’ve all tried something like this). – Photo: Jake Grant

There are many programming languages out there, as my computer science major friends would tell you. Perhaps you’ve heard of a few notable ones like Java, Python, and C. This past semester, I took a class solely dedicated to MATLAB, which is has a reasonable claim to be the worst of them all. A glorified calculator, MATLAB is good for matrix multiplication and approximately nothing else, in my humble opinion. How does this relate to aviation, you ask? Good question!

CDG External | Air France

Basically, this had to become code CDG – Photo: Air France

In this class, a series of coding puzzles, we messed around with web APIs and other applications. That’s where the planes come in. Naturally, I decided if I had to do a convoluted project, I would do it about something I actually liked. I took my programming language to flightstats.com and started digging.