Browsing Tag: contest

If you are not familiar with Frontier Airlines, each one of their aircraft have a different animal on the tail. It makes it fun for kids (heck, who are we fooling — everyone) to know which animal plane you are flying on. Frontier recently release two audition reels in hopes of motivating people to vote for the next animal to show on one of their tails.

So, view the video above, then check out audition reel part two and finally cast your vote!

HI-RES PHOTO (click for larger). On December 16th, Boeing delivered their 7000th 737 to flydubai. The airplane is flydubai’s 14th Next-Generation 737-800 with the new Boeing Sky Interior. Photo by Boeing.

HI-RES PHOTO (click for larger). On December 16th, Boeing delivered their 7000th 737 to flydubai. The airplane is flydubai’s 14th Next-Generation 737-800 with the new Boeing Sky Interior. Photo by Boeing.

On Friday I posed the question, “How many Boeing 737s are still flying today,” and I received a lot of responses. So what is the answer? (insert drum roll here)…

… did you click that drum roll link? It really adds to the suspense. If you did not do it before, it is not too late

According to Boeing, there are 5,424 737s still flying today with 358 airlines in 114 countries. Knowing that the first 737 flew on April 9, 1967, that is AMAZING! So, who were the three that got the closest and are winning a free internet session with GoGo In-Flight Internet?

* Thibaut: 5418
* Allen Cheng: 5419
* Will Pestle 5423 (only one away)

Some of you just guessed random numbers (which works out okay) and others went through some pretty impressive formulas. I was amazing how many people were pretty close to the final answers. A big thanks go GoGo for providing three prizes for this contest!

As promised, here are some other great facts about the 737 that come directly from Boeing:

* Today’s 737s are 5 percent more fuel efficient than the first models delivered. By late-2012, the airplanes will be a full 7 percent more efficient, with full incorporation of the latest performance improvement package. The additional 2 percent equates to $120,000 savings per airplane per year, and tons fewer carbon emissions.

* It was just shy of 15 years between the first Next-Generation 737 order and the 5,000th order. The Next-Generation 737 reached this order milestone more quickly than any other commercial jet in history.

* Airlines ordered 724 of the Next-Generation 737 models between the Next-Generation program launch Nov. 17, 1993, and the day the first airplane was delivered on Dec. 12, 1997.

* The Next-Generation 737 is as long as it is wide, earning it the nickname of the first ’œsquare’ airplane.

* The Next-Generation 737 uses an advanced system called Head-up Display or HUD, which comprises a transparent glass display positioned between the pilot’s eye and flight deck window to show critical information such as airspeed, altitude and attitude, and flight path. The Next-Generation 737 is the leader of large commercial jetliners produced today with this capability. Boeing is proud to introduce HUD as part of its basic systems equipment for both pilots on our 787.

* The Next-Generation 737 airplane wing thermal anti-ice system has the capability of outputting hot air on the wing leading edge equivalent to about six full-sized (100,000 BTU) household furnaces.

* Within five years of entering service, the worldwide fleet of Next-Generation 737s surpassed 10 million flight hours, a feat equal to one airplane flying more than 1,141 years nonstop. The Next-Generation 737 is the first and only commercial jetliner to reach this milestone so quickly.

* On July 27, 2006, Boeing delivered the 2,000th Next-Generation 737 six years sooner than any other commercial jet airplane. The milestone delivery ’“ a 737-700 to Southwest Airlines ’“ occurred nine years after Southwest received the first Next-Generation 737.

* There are approximately 36.6 miles (59 kilometers) of wire on the Next-Generation 737-600/-700/-800/-900ER (extended range) models, four miles (6.4 kilometers) less than the 737-300/-400/-500 models.

* On average, there are approximately 367,000 parts on a Next-Generation 737 airplane.

* Overall, the entire 737 family is the best-selling commercial jet in history, with orders for more than 9,100 airplanes through the end of November 2011. More than 6,900 have been delivered.

* On Feb. 13, 2006, Boeing delivered the 5,000th 737 to Southwest Airlines. Guinness World Records acknowledged the 737 as the most-produced large commercial jet airplane in aviation history.

* Typically, about 50 gallons (189 liters) of paint are used to paint an average 737. Once the paint is dry, it will weigh approximately 250 pounds (113 kilograms) per airplane, depending on the paint scheme.

The first Boeing 737. Photo found via Gordon Werner / Flickr

The first Boeing 737, which does not have GoGo Internet. Photo found via Gordon Werner / Flickr.

NOTE: The contest is now over. You can view the answer here.

Today, Boeing delivered their 7,000th 737 to FlyDubai — those are a lot of airplanes.

To celebrate this monumental achievement I feel like holding a contest. I was asked by a reader (thanks Robert G), “How many 737s out of the 7000 are still flying,” and that is a great question. I turned that question over to Boeing and have received an official answer that I am using for the contest. I also sent out a few “crack-team information finders” (thanks Dan and Ben) to see if there would be some website that would easily give the answer away (that happened during my last contest) and I feel confident this one is not easy.

Now, I am turning that question over to you: How many Boeing 737s are still flying today? (according to the official answer that Boeing gave to me on 12/15/11 – Note that although Boeing gave me the answer for the contest, they are no way involved with the contest)

Oh and there are some real prizes to go along with this one. GoGo Inflight Internet has agreed to give the three closest guesses a free internet session for their next flight (which makes a great stocking stuffer — for yourself).

So send me an email (da***@ai*************.com) or leave a comment with your best guess (you only get one). You have until the end of the day Monday the 19th to guess and then I will reveal the answer with all sorts of other great facts about the legendary Boeing 737.

Game on.