Around the World

Miles flown for stories
2015: 25,266
2014: 363,407
Total: 946,866

PHOTOS: Airbus Shows off Special “Carbon” Livery on Third A350

Click Image for Larger Verion. Photo and information from Airbus: On Thursday 2nd January 2014 Airbus rolled-out its third A350 XWB flight-test aircraft, MSN2, from the paint shop in Toulouse, marking yet another successful milestone on the path to entry-into-service in Q4 2014. As well as featuring a distinctive “Carbon” signature livery to reflect its primary construction from advanced materials, this aircraft is also the first of two A350 flight test aircraft to be equipped with a full passenger cabin interior. MSN2 will join the A350 XWB flight test fleet in the coming weeks and will be the first A350 to transport passengers when it undertakes the Early Long Flights (ELF) later in the year. Composite materials in Airbus aircraft have seen a step-by-step introduction that started with the A310 which was first rolled-out in February 1982. Benefiting from over 30 years of composite material experience, 53% of the A350 XWB’s airframe is made-up of carbon-fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) including Airbus’ first carbon-fibre fuselage.

Airbus’ third A350 XWB (MSN2) shows off a special livery. Photo: Airbus

Today Airbus unveiled a special livery on their third A350 XWB (MSN2). The “carbon” signature livery celebrates the aircraft’s usage from advance materials, like (wait for it) carbon.

Not only does this aircraft has a slick outside, it will also be the first test A350 to be equipped with a full passenger interior. It will still be a few weeks before MSN2 joins the A350 test fleet (currently just MSN1). The aircraft will undertake Early Long Flights (ELF) later this year.

This livery looks as good coming as going. Photo: Airbus

This livery looks as good coming as going. Photo: Airbus

ADDITIONAL AIRBUS A350 XWB GOODIES

Happy New Year — Airline Reporter 2013 Review

Just some of the very cool things we did in 2013.

Just some of the very cool things we did in 2013

How the heck is it 2014 already? Time sure does fly, and so have we! This year our team flew over 330,000 miles (or almost 14 times around the world), which is crazy since we only flew about 90,000 miles in 2012. We have been able to grow with more writers, more readers, and more unique (and, I like to think, interesting) content.

We have experienced many ups and down this last year (more ups than downs) and we have been able to share stories in ways that we never have before. At this point we have over 33,000 followers on Twitter, almost 4.7 million views on our Flickr, over 2,200 Facebook fans (we are looking for more), and 2.2 million views of our videos on YouTube. Those are impressive and we love that you love what we do!

As many will do at the end of the year, I want to take a look back and see what worked and did not work for 2013.

Continue reading Happy New Year — Airline Reporter 2013 Review

All Things 787: Blogger Profile

Boeing shared this photo of the 787-9 flying over Mt. Rainier.

787-9 Dreamliner flying over Mt. Rainier – Photo: Boeing

We don’t feature a lot of writers on our “Blogroll” section of the site, but All Things 787 has been a mainstay.  Started by Uresh Sheth (@ureshs) in 2008, the site digs in to the nitty gritty of 787 production and delivery details.  As a data geek, I’ve spent many hours delving in to the spreadsheets on All Things 787, and as a frequent flier, I’ve often looked at delivery positions, hoping for a future flight to be serviced by a new-build Dreamliner.  The site has had over 5.3 million views since its inception, which means many others share my same interest.

What has always impressed me the most about All Things 787 is the amazing detail (which, translated, means Uresh has to have exceptional access and sources).  As Uresh is a friend of Airline Reporter, I recently reached out to him for an interview about his site, the 787, and the readers that help fuel his enthusiasm.

Detailed delivery status of Boeing 787 - Image: All Things 787

An example of the detailed delivery status of the Boeing 787 – Image: All Things 787

Continue reading All Things 787: Blogger Profile

A Look at How Honeywell Improves Aviation Safety

N670H was the first aircraft in the world to be certified with TCAS. Photo by Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter.com

N670H was the first aircraft in the world to be certified with TCAS. Photo by Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter.com

Recently I spent a day with Honeywell Aerospace and it had clearly worked its way into my brain at a deeper-than-expected level.

Before I found the opportunity to go over my notes and write a follow-up article about my time with the Honeywell Crash Test Dummies up at Paine Field, I found myself on board an American Airlines Boeing 737. My first thought, after it was clear that tower had given us a “taxi into position and hold” command for Runway 34R at SEA was, “I sure hope this aircraft has RAAS.

Runway Awareness and Advisory System is a Honeywell Aerospace product that allows pilots to enhance their situational awareness by providing audible and visual cues about the aircraft’s location relative to its destined runway. Once the aircraft arrives on the runway, it is capable of reminding flight crew that they are still on the runway after one minute and thirty seconds. This time was decided on by Honeywell’s research team. After ninety seconds on the runway, research shows that the safe course of action is to make a radio call to the tower reminding them of your position and intent. That technology alone saves lives and prevents damage, but if you think Honeywell stopped there, you would be wrong.

Continue reading A Look at How Honeywell Improves Aviation Safety

Ultimate Airport Dubai Goes Behind The Scenes at DXB

Emirate Airline's Network Control at DXB. Image: Jason Rabinowitz.

Emirate Airline’s Network Control at DXB. Image: Jason Rabinowitz.

Dubai International Airport (DXB) is a hugely complex, massive, 24-hour machine. Airplanes land, passengers are exchanged, and airplanes takeoff. What goes on behind the scenes to make this seemingly simple task work, however, is anything but simple. Earlier this year, National Geographic UK took their cameras into the depths of Dubai’s airport, giving the public a rare look at operations at the home airport of Emirates.

BONUS: Photo Tour of Emirates Airline Crew Training in Dubai

The show aired several months ago in various regions, but never made it to the Americas. What the channel guide hides from us, YouTube reveals – all ten episodes are now streaming in HD for anyone to watch. The first episode of the show starts off quite nicely, focusing on the difficulty of getting passengers with short connections across the gigantic terminal, routine mechanical difficulties, and a scramble to finish up construction of a new wing of the terminal.

Click here to learn more and to view the Ultimate Airport Dubai Video