Browsing Tag: Singapore

Our United 787-9 being made ready for the inaugural long-haul LAX-SIN flight.

Our United 787-9 being made ready for the inaugural long-haul LAX-SIN flight

Superlatives abounded on this, the inaugural non-stop flight from Los Angeles to Singapore. It’s billed as the third-longest direct flight in the world and the longest to originate from the United States.

There was even a ribbon-cutting ceremony - the presence of a trade delegation highlighted the fact that economic ties are strong between Singapore and the U.S.

There was even a ribbon-cutting ceremony – the presence of a trade delegation highlighted the fact that economic ties are strong between Singapore and the U.S.

The flight takes 17 hours, five minutes to cover the 8,772 miles between Los Angeles and Singapore. Favorable headwinds shaved an hour off our flight time, but, still. It’s an awfully long time to be in the air.

A Singapore Airlines Boeing 777-300ER taxis for departure at Sydney - Photo: Rory Delaney

A Singapore Airlines Boeing 777-300ER taxis for departure at Sydney – Photo: Rory Delaney

It has been over eight years since my last Singapore Airlines (SQ) flight. I have always had a great fondness for SQ; after all, it was the first airline I traveled on internationally when I was just four years old, going from Australia to Europe. Even when I flew them eight years ago, they were still in my opinion the carrier to beat in economy class. With much excitement and anticipation, I booked my next series of flights with Singapore Airlines, as they turned out to be the cheapest and most convenient option for a recent work trip to Southeast Asia. I was curious to see if they were still able to deliver a class-leading product in economy class, even with the ever increasing threat of competition from the three large Middle Eastern carriers.

I ended up taking four flights for my trip, but I will focus on the first flight I took from Munich to Singapore.  This flight left the strongest impression on me, and the fact that there were only about 80 passengers in economy class made for a very comfortable flight.

T4-TBIT connector at LAX: Overlooking the ramp between TBIT and T4 at LAX.

T4-TBIT connector at LAX: Overlooking the ramp between TBIT and T4 at LAX

A couple of weeks ago, I was one of the first to report on the opening of the new Connector facility between Terminal 4 (T4) and the Tom Bradley International Terminal (TBIT) at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). While this is exciting news in my world, I will admit that sometimes I forget that not everyone is a frequent-flying fanatic or even an #AvGeek. So here I am, to make the case to the everyday person on the street on just why the new T4 Connector is so monumental to the improvement to the passenger experience at LAX.

A bit overly dramatic? You be the judge…

A side view of Silk Air's first 737-8SA. Photo - Bernie Leighton AirlineReporter.com

Side view of SilkAir’s first Boeing 737-8SA – Photo: Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter

February 21, 1989 was an important day for Singapore Airlines. On that day, their regional affiliate Tradewinds Airlines took off using MD-87s for previously unserved Southeast Asian destinations like Bandar Seri Begawan.

Tradewinds continued until 1992 when it was renamed SilkAir. If you have not noticed, it is almost February 21, 2014. In other words, we are quickly approaching the twenty-fifth anniversary of SilkAir. On top of that, this is also the Chinese Lunar New Year period. There is a lot to celebrate at SilkAir. Most of all, the delivery of their first Boeing 737-8SA.

A Chinese Lion Dance to bring in the new year and celebrate a new era of SilkAir.  - Photo: Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter.com

A Chinese Lion Dance to bring in the new year and celebrate a new era of SilkAir – Photo: Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter

SilkAir is celebrating a lot of firsts with delivery of 9V-MGA (internally referred to as “my great aircraft”). Their first 737 NextGen, their largest aircraft order (54 frames), and their fastest year-on-year fleet growth (they are accepting eight frames this year).