Browsing Tag: Boeing 737-200

Often an airline will purchase or lease an aircraft from another airline and keep the majority of the previous livery until it is re-painted or the lease is over. The result is a mixture of two airline liveries and are treasures of airline nerds. Southwest Airlines recently took a look back at some of interim liveries of the past. I thought it would be interesting to see who can match the livery with the previous airline the aircraft was with.

Without cheating, how many liveries can you match with the previous airline? It is ok to guess and be wrong (I guess one wrong myself — oops)

PLANE #1: This Boeing 737-2T4 photo was taken in 1991

PLANE #1: This Boeing 737-200 photo was taken in 1991

PLANE #2 This Boeing 737-2T4 was first leased in 1983, then purchased by Southwest in 1984

PLANE #2: This Boeing 737-200 was first leased in 1983, then purchased by Southwest in 1984

This Boeing 737-200 was leased by Southwest for about a year in 1987-88

PLANE #3 This Boeing 737-200 was leased by Southwest for about a year in 1987-88

Plane #4: This Boeing 737-200 is unique not having the white "Southwest" on the tail due to the tail being white

Plane #4: This Boeing 737-200 is unique not having the white "Southwest" on the tail due to the tail being white

Plane #5: This Boeing 737-300 is pretty tricky

Plane #5: This Boeing 737-300 is pretty tricky (and the one I missed)

I will give you the weekend to guess in the comments and on Monday I will reveal the answers. Prizes? I will give you a shout out and you will have the satisfaction of being a true airline livery nerd!

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Images from Southwest Airlines
United 737-200 taking off at LAX. Circa 1992

United 737-200 taking off at LAX. Circa 1992

On April 28, 1968, United Airlines flew its first Boeing 737-200 on an inaugural flight between Chicago and Grand Rapids. Over 41 years later, a Boeing 737-300 will be the last Boeing 737 to fly in United Airline colors.

Instead of going with the next generation of Boeing 737’s, United chose to go with Airbus A320s instead. The last flight will start off in Washington DC on October 28th and end up in San Francisco where it will be prepared for its retirement. The airline was only flying 737-300’s and 737-500’s and most likely the Airbus A320 will replace the lost 737’s.

Source: NYC Aviation Image: JW Jets

Aviacsa Boeing 737-200 at McCarran Int'l Airport in Las Vegas

Aviacsa Boeing 737-200 at McCarran Int'l Airport in Las Vegas

Due to reports of irregularities of Aviacsa’s airline maintenance, Mexico has demanded no more of their planes fly and have 60 days to fix any issues. The airline has a fleet of 26 planes, serving 17 cities, including Las Vegas.

The airline is defending themselves saying the problems were only “cosmetic — opaque logos, dull lights and scratches on the wings.”

The Transportation and Communications Department however stated that the issues found “put passengers at risk,” and it would be odd for a government to shut down an airline due to faded logos. The fact that 21 of their planes are Boeing 737-200’s and the others are Boeing 737-300 (as of Sept 2008), they are not new planes and could likely have other issues.

Source: AP Image: gTarded