Frontier Airlines Airbus A320 (N220FR) with sharklets - Photo: Frontier Airlines

New Frontier Airbus A320 (N220FR) with sharklets – Photo: Frontier Airlines

Republic Airways Holdings has finally offloaded Frontier Airlines to a new owner, and right at the deadline.  Earlier this week, Indigo Partners agreed to purchase Frontier and continue the push towards making them an ultra-low-cost carrier (ULCC).  Indigo and its head, William Franke, know a thing or two about ULCCs; up until recently they were responsible for Spirit Airlines’ growth to become a leader in the segment.

Frontier’s acquisition by a new owner obviously raises questions about their future, particularly as it relates to their home base of Denver International Airport.  Since 2006, when Southwest Airlines started ramping up its presence, Denver has been a three-carrier hub (with United Airlines being the third).  Many have doubted the stability and longevity of such an arrangement; as a Denver-based flyer, I can attest to the fact that the three carriers have managed to keep airfares extremely low.

Frontier A320 at SeaTac - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

Frontier A320 at SeaTac – Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

Frontier has a significant presence in Denver, with a majority of its nearly 4,000 employees based here.  Long-considered Denver’s “hometown airline,” Frontier seemed to lose its way when first acquired by Republic, moving the headquarters to Indianapolis and merging the carrier with Midwest, eliminating the Midwest brand (although there are still a few planes painted in their livery) as well as the popular warm chocolate chip cookies.  Since moving the HQ back to Denver in 2012, Frontier has been making a concerted effort to reestablish themselves as the hometown carrier of Denver (and Colorado) through local advertising, sponsorship, and involvement.

As part of the purchase agreement, Republic is giving Indigo their 80 Airbus A319neo and A320neo slots for $32 million in cash (to reimburse for deposits made with Airbus).  Indigo will also inherit a fleet of over 50 A319 and A320 jets (Frontier recently retired their last A318).  This fleet looks very similar to the fleet that Spirit has been operating, another benefit for Indigo.  That being said, this acquisition will come down to whether or not labor approves, a hurdle that Indigo needs to figure out how to clear.

Ultimately, it will be interesting to see how Frontier moves forward.  Business travelers (who often pay higher fares) have all but fled Frontier as it has devalued their product and focused more flying to leisure destinations (a la Allegiant Air).  The big winner with business travelers from Denver will likely be United, whom I’ve moved nearly all my travel to.  I really hope Frontier can successfully find a market niche that allows them to continue to serve Denver and coexist with Southwest and United.

MANAGING EDITOR - DENVER, CO. Due to his family being split on opposite sides of the country, Blaine traveled frequently as a child, falling in love with the flying experience, and has continued to travel ever since. For AirlineReporter, Blaine edits all content before publishing, assists in story and concept development, and takes every chance he gets to produce original content for the site. When Blaine’s not busy planning his next travel adventure, he spends his time working as a college administrator. If he can’t be on an airplane, he’d prefer to be on a bicycle or playing with his two toddlers with his wife. Email: [email protected].

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6 Comments
Will Schilling

I flew thru DIA yesterday on WN on my way to LGA. One thing I noticed was how busy the Southwest’s ops were compared to Frontier. Frontier has abandoned my town (SMF) so I couldn’t even price them. Hope it works out for them.

Blaine Nickeson

Will, DIA is adding 4 new gates on the C concourse for WN

Bryan Bedford leaves behind him a trail of failed and broken airlines. Here’s to hoping F9 can figure it out. It’s telling that I have more faith in former Spirit execs than Bedford. An insult, really.

The true test will be in the customer reviews; many, if not most, of the stuff I’ve found online about Spirit makes me very hesitant to step aboard NKS…I used to enjoy flying Frontier II quite a bit, but I’m not so sure I’ll have the same warm and fuzzies about this edition once it goes ULCC.

Mike H.

Frontier better not become another Spirit Airlines, cramming passengers into 28 inches of leg room for the same price as the other carriers.

Collene Curran

This creates a sad state of affairs for Denver frequent flyers. Frontier at least treated us better than cargo prior to it’s purchase. Now, there’s not even the illusion that a passesnger is any more than an object that pays to occupy a seat. Staff will tell you delightfully that you may file a complaint. I have no doubt they can spit on passengers with complete impunity. I didn’t think it was possible to replicate the experience of being on a Continental Trailways bus, but they have done it. All I can do is try to use my 50k miles and then stay as far away from Frontier as possible. For your own sanity, I suggest you stay as far away from Frontier, too. No Mo

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