Oops! Pilots on Qantas Airlines Forget to Lower Landing Gear
Qantas flight JQ12, a Boeing 767, was on approach at Syndney Airport on October 26th, when the pilots received a “gear too low” warning at about 700 feet. They had forgotten to put their landing gear down. They reacted quickly, aborted the landing and flew around again. Normally the aircraft should lower its gear between 2000 and 1500 feet.
It appears there was a communication breakdown between who was lowering the gear. Both pilots have stepped down during the investigation.
“The incident was reported to the ATSB and the pilots were stood down. We are supporting the ATSB’s investigation and our own investigations will determine what further action might be warranted,” a Qantas spokes person confirmed.
The airline states there was no “flight safety issue,” which I would have to disagree with. If the warning system had malfunctioned, this incident could have turned out much different. Putting down the landing gear is one of those important things to remember on a pilot’s landing checklist and should not be taken lightly when overlooked.
Source: News.com.au Image: Andrew Tallon
http://www.news.com.au/travel/story/0,28318,26303318-5014090,00.html
Qantas Boeing 767-300ER landing (with gears down)

Qantas Boeing 767-300ER landing (with gears down)

A Qantas Boeing 767, was on approach at Sydney Airport on October 26th, when the pilots received a “gear too low” warning at about 700 feet. They had forgotten to put their landing gear down. They reacted quickly, aborted the landing and flew around again. Normally the aircraft should lower its gear between 2000 and 1500 feet.

It appears there was a communication breakdown between who was lowering the gear. Both pilots have stepped down during the investigation.

“The incident was reported to the ATSB and the pilots were stood down. We are supporting the ATSB’s investigation and our own investigations will determine what further action might be warranted,” a Qantas spokes person confirmed.

The airline states there was no “flight safety issue,” which I would have to disagree with. If the warning system had malfunctioned, this incident could have turned out much different. Putting down the landing gear is one of those important things to remember on a pilot’s landing checklist and should not be taken lightly when overlooked.

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Source: News.com.au Image: Andrew Tallon

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & FOUNDER - SEATTLE, WA. David has written, consulted, and presented on multiple topics relating to airlines and travel since 2008. He has been quoted and written for a number of news organizations, including BBC, CNN, NBC News, Bloomberg, and others. He is passionate about sharing the complexities, the benefits, and the fun stuff of the airline business. Email me: [email protected]

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7 Comments

david, i TOTALLY agree with you on this. metal hitting cement at god knows what speed does not sound good from any angle. “oh well” i suppose. thank god the alert worked! or else . . .

Temo Madrigal

It would have been a very messing “landing”! When you say that the pilots have have “stepped down”, does that mean they have quit?

Hey Temo!

It means they are not flying while they figure out what to do!

David

Maurice Stander

You’ve heard about the pilot that forgot to put the gear down and had to use FULL POWER to taxi to the gate.

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