China Eastern's first Boeing 777-300ER seen next to the Future of Flight - Photo: Jeremy Dwyer Lindgren / NYCAviation.com

China Eastern’s first Boeing 777-300ER seen next to the Future of Flight – Photo: Jeremy Dwyer Lindgren / NYCAviation.com

Covering a story for AirlineReporter can be a dangerous business. Originally we had our Lee Zerrilla heading to the reveal of China Eastern’s first Boeing 777-300ER, when BAM he got in a minor accident. Lee is okay, but sad he was not able to make it to the event.

Have no fear, our good friends at NYCAviation (and photographer Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren) were nice enough to share their photos and information about the aircraft (thanks guys!).

Although, the photos end up showing what, I think, is a pretty ugly livery, it is what is on the inside that counts with this bird.

This is not the first time we have seen China Eastern’s new livery on the 777. We saw it when it came out of the paint booth and I have to say that I wasn’t a fan. Heck, I might have even called it the worst livery ever. Maybe a tad bit harsh, but I am just not a fan of these bland designs.

Okay. The livery doesn't look half bad in the sunset - Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

Okay. The livery doesn’t look half bad in the sunset – Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

Some wondered if this was a temporary livery, but no, this is China Eastern’s new official livery.

The new logo on the tail is not so bad. It is a swallow consisting of the letters C and E, which represents the airline’s name. Sure, that is fine and dandy, but why so boring for the rest of the aircraft?

The airline was more excited to show off the new interior of the aircraft, which is probably the part that most passengers will care most about.

The large first class cabin on China Eastern's 777-300ER - Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

The large first class cabin on China Eastern’s 777-300ER – Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

Each of the new 777-300ERs will have a three-cabin layout: first, business, and economy. The first row in first class is in a 1-1 configuration, while the second row, located behind a bar area, is in a 1-2-1 layout.

The double suite bed in China Eastern's first class - Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgre | NYCAvation.com

The double suite bed in China Eastern’s first class – Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAvation.com

The middle seats in the 1-2-1 set up can combine to create one large suite with enough room for… well… use your imagination (mostly just allows passengers to get a good night’s sleep).

The suites feature 80 inches of seat pitch and their own sliding doors, creating your own world within the aircraft.

China Eastern's new business class product - Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

China Eastern’s new business class product – Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

The business class section has 52 seats and is in a 1-2-1 configuration, giving every passenger the much desired aisle access. The seats lie flat with 46″ of pitch and the expected large screens and power ports for charging.

The economy cabin is configured with 10 seats abreast - Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

The economy cabin is configured with 10 seats abreast – Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

For those sitting in the back of the plane, they will find the economy section configured with 10 seats abreast in a 3-4-3 layout with a range of 32-33″ of seat pitch. Each passenger gets their own on-demand eX3 entertainment system which is leaps and bounds better than the old-school, ceiling-mounted IFE system found in their Airbus A340-600s.

Economy seats in a pink hue - Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

Economy seats in a pink hue – Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

Of course the airline was excited to take delivery of the first of 20 777s that they have on order.

“We are delighted to introduce our first 777-300ER in China Eastern’s new look in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the 777-300ER program,” said Liu Shaoyong, Chairman of China Eastern Airlines. “The delivery not only marks a milestone in the long-standing business relationship between China Eastern and Boeing, but also signals the modernization of our world-class fleet and the enhancement of the competitiveness of our trans-Pacific routes.”

The 777 next to the Future of Flight at Paine Field - Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

The 777 next to the Future of Flight at Paine Field – Photo: Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren | NYCAviation.com

China Eastern plans to use the 777s to add new cities in North America and increase frequencies to some of the cities they currently serve, like Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Vancouver, and Toronto.

The new aircraft will start service in November from Shanghai to LAX (the airline uses the A330-200 currently) and JFK (the airline uses the A340-600 currently).

A brand spanking new Boeing 777-300ER at Paine Field showing China Eastern's new livery- Photo: Bernie Leighton

China Eastern’s first 777-300ER during flight testing at Paine Field – Photo: Bernie Leighton | AirlineReporter

“We are honored to play an integral role in China Eastern’s growing success as a leading global airline,” said Ray Conner, president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “The 777-300ER is a perfect fit for China Eastern’s long-haul fleet and we are pleased to celebrate this milestone delivery together.”

Let’s just hope someday they make a change to that livery.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & FOUNDER - SEATTLE, WA. David has written, consulted, and presented on multiple topics relating to airlines and travel since 2008. He has been quoted and written for a number of news organizations, including BBC, CNN, NBC News, Bloomberg, and others. He is passionate about sharing the complexities, the benefits, and the fun stuff of the airline business. Email me: david@airlinereporter.com

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10 Comments

Mr. Brown, get over your obsessive dislike of the simple livery. The decision was made, and it’s here to stay, for at least five+ if not ten+ years.

The real deal is the 3-4-3 layout in economy. I was on their trans-pacific flights with A330, which has a 2-4-2 layout in economy; it wasn’t fun sitting in either of the two seats in the middle. An aisle seat is much more preferable.

Well Petten, the beauty of running AirlineReporter is I get complain about it as much as I want :). However, I think I am mostly over it and will move on. I am hoping that it won’t be around for ten years — that would be a shame.

The 3-4-3 is not fun for long-haul, but has become the standard for most airlines. Back in the day, most airlines would deliver them with a 3-3-3 (Eva still does), but almost all go for the 10.

David

David Schachtschneider

David! I think you’re abolutely right about the livery, it just sucks, I have no other words to say it…

On to other business… I’ll be traveling to Monterrey from Mexico City next week and I’m trying to get a seat on a Superjet 100 from Interjet, and very excited about it! I’m an avid reader of your blog and a recent av-geek (partly thanks to you), this would be my first time in a Russian aircraft!

Best regards!

Hey David,

That will be exciting. Let me know how it goes. I haven’t been on the Superjet and I have been wanting to. I have heard mixed reviews.

David

Why all the hating? Can’t we all just get along 😉

Blaine Nickeson

Mal’s skinny – he doesn’t mind the 10-abreast.

I don’t like the livery either. However, as David points out, you cannot see it from inside the airplane. I’m also not a fan of the 3-4-5 on a 777, but it is the norm. That J-class seat and Personal Space is wonderful! Good report -with borrowed details -C.

Contra-opinion: I like the livery; it’s clean & crisp !

Since you’re on record for liking the absolutely hideous COdbaUA livery, I find it laughable you’re bashing this one so much and saying “you’re not a fan of all these bland liveries” when infact, you like probably the WORST and most half-assed one of all time.

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