37 #7500 rolls out of the paint hanger destined for Malindo Air. Photo: Boeing

737 Number 7500 rolls out of the paint hangar destined for Malindo Air. Photo from Boeing

Today, the 7,500th 737 (9M-LNF) was delivered to Malindo Air.  Malindo Air is a joint venture airline between Lion Air of Indonesia and the National Aerospace and Defense Industries (NADI) of Malaysia and the airline name takes after the two countries in the partnership (Malaysia & Indonesia).

Set to begin operations in May of this year, the airline will receive 12 737-900ERs with plans to increase this number in the future.  Based out of Kuala Lumpur the airline will service domestic flights within Malaysia to begin and expand to other South East Asian Countries.

Dinesh Keskar, senior vice president of Asia Pacific and India Sales, Commercial Airplanes cuts the ribbon with Capt. Darsito Hendro S., chief operating officer of Malindo Air to celebrate the delivery. Photo: Boeing

Dinesh Keskar, senior vice president of Asia Pacific and India Sales, Commercial Airplanes cuts the ribbon with Capt. Darsito Hendro S., chief operating officer of Malindo Air to celebrate the delivery. Photo: Boeing

The aircraft delivered to Malindo air is fitted with the new Boeing Sky Interior which brings in the new modern designed interior similar to the Boeing 787 with LED lighting, larger pivoting overhead bins and a greater feeling of spaciousness.

This is a far cry from the first 737, which was delivered to Lufthansa in 1967.

The Economy Cabin of the Malindo 737-900ER - Photo: Boeing

The Economy Cabin of the Malindo 737-900ER – Photo: Boeing

To help fulfill the back log of orders, Boeing has recently increased their production of 737s from 35 per month to 38, heading towards the 2014 goal of 42 —  that’s roughly 1.3 aircraft per day.

Boeing has been able to up this production rate by redesigning their process and changing the way the aircraft are produced on site in Renton.

Malindo Air's 737-900ER prior to Touch Down at Everett during a Test Flight - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter,com

Malindo Air’s 737-900ER prior to touching down at Everett during a test flight – Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter,com

The production increase is timed well. On the 19th, Boeing signed another large order with Ryanair for another 175 Boeing 737NG aircraft putting the backlog up even higher.

Think Boeing can end up delivering 18,000 aircraft someday? 7500 aircraft down, only 10500 to go!

This story written by…Malcolm Muir, Lead Correspondent. Mal is an Australian Avgeek now living and working in Seattle. With a passion for aircraft photography, traveling and the fun that combining the two can bring. Insights into the aviation world with a bit of a perspective thanks to working in the travel industry.@BigMalX | BigMal’s World | Photos

CORRESPONDENT - SEATTLE, WA. Mal is an Australian native who has been a huge fan of airlines and aviation and currently works in airport-related operations. Email: [email protected]

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9 Comments

Paint “hanger” – ?

🙂

Hi Matt

I am Australian mind you so we use the Queen’s english 😉

Hey Malcolm, thats 12500 to go mate 🙂

Hey Vishal

It is definately 10500 to go. That’s the official Boeing count. David (who edits all our stories) changed the figure but he obviously wasn’t able to get that 2nd shoe off to count it out properly.

Mal

It is true. Math is not my strongest suit. Especially with lack of sleep 🙂

Sorry Mal.

David

If you’re going to mention the Lufthansa from 1967 then include a photo, otherwise it really isn’t worth mentioning.

Nothing more frustrating these days to be on the net and the new article, blog, website refers to an image of something and doesn’t include a photo.

I found one here: http://www.boeingblogs.com/randy/archives/2012/11/737_flashback.html

Hello J Roy,

The fun part of a blog is creating community and letting readers contribute to the story. We appreciate your nice addition!

David

bigbenaugust

The 737-100s and -200s were so cute. 🙂

I saw one in Brazilian air force (FAB) colors once, parked next to an FAB ACJ (so, an A319). Such a difference in age and design.

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