B & W Seaplane, the first Boeing plane, named after Boeing Founder, William Boeing

B & W Seaplane, the first Boeing plane, named after Boeing Founder, William Boeing

Tomorrow morning (Thursday) I will have the great opportunity to sit down with the Boeing Historian for an interview. I feel overwhelmed with questions I could and want to ask.

However, I want to share this opportunity with you as well. What questions do you have for the Boeing Historian? Either leave them as a comment or email them to [email protected]porter.com and if I am wondering the same thing, I will ask!

Image: Boeing

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & FOUNDER - SEATTLE, WA. David has written, consulted, and presented on multiple topics relating to airlines and travel since 2008. He has been quoted and written for a number of news organizations, including BBC, CNN, NBC News, Bloomberg, and others. He is passionate about sharing the complexities, the benefits, and the fun stuff of the airline business. Email me: [email protected]

http://www.airlinereporter.com
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10 Comments

Who, what and where do the Boeing plane designers and engineers find their source of inspiration?

Thanks!

Firdaus
@fhxoxo

What’s V1 at max load and no winds

Has Boeing ever asked you to fudge history a bit to make the company look better in a poor situation?

Doctor Smith

What ever happened to the SST model I’ve heard about — all Boeing Old-Timers talk about it and how it almost killed the company when canceled — is there anything of it left?

is there anywhere where we can see older Boeing airliners like the 367-80 (Dash 80)?

OysterEngineer

Who lead the configuration development of the B-47?

Does The Boeing company have any top secret projects for the government or private millionaires?

The 787 has been delayed numerous times. Were there delays in rolling out previous new lines such as the 747, 777, ect…

What is his favorite Boeing airplane?

What is the most interesting plane Boeing has ever designed? Why do you think so?

Is a twin-aisle narrowbody economically feasible, and why did Boeing ultimately not press forward with the 7J7 (was it purely economic)?

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