Mesaba Airlines runs operations for Delta Connection

Mesaba Airlines runs operations for Delta Connection

Senator Charles Schumer from New York is trying to change what information customers receive while booking their tickets online.

Most regional carriers that are branded with a major airline’s name and logo are actually run by smaller, individually owned regional airlines. For example, Continental Express & American Eagle Airlines are both made up of two regional airlines and Delta Connection is made up of almost 10 regional airlines.

The Regional Carrier Disclosure Act of 2009 being proposed by Schumer would require online travel websites to clearly list which regional carrier would be operating the flight. Some websites already display this information, but require multiple clicks to find it. The idea behind the legislation is to allow potential passengers to make an informed decision on what airline they would actually fly on.

The action by the senator comes in the wake of the February 12th crash of Continental Connection Flight 3407 which took all 50 lives on board. Although that tragic accident has brought up many legitimate questions about the safety of some regional carriers, I wonder if this legislation would make any difference. Here are a few things I see wrong with this proposal (yes I love lists):

#1.  In most regions, there aren’t many other options. Airlines run the smaller aircraft on certain flights, since that is the only way to keep it profitable. In some cases a person might be able to find a similar flight with a larger aircraft, but most of the time a traveler would need to find alternative transportation or just not go.

#2.  This seems like it will do nothing but raise people’s fear of flying. It has been shown over and over again that flying, even in small aircraft, is very safe transportation.  Singling out regional carriers could really hurt them for no reason.

#3. Does the average flier know what flying on “Shuttle America” vs “Delta Connection” means? Do people know what “Delta Connection” vs “Delta Airlines” mean? I don’t think it quite defines what kind of aircraft a person would be flying on for most people.

I am all about improving the airline industry and especially safety regulation that will actually save lives. This seems more like feel-good legislation and I am not really sure how it would go about saving lives or making regional carriers any safer. But maybe I missed something?

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & FOUNDER - SEATTLE, WA. David has written, consulted, and presented on multiple topics relating to airlines and travel since 2008. He has been quoted and written for a number of news organizations, including BBC, CNN, NBC News, Bloomberg, and others. He is passionate about sharing the complexities, the benefits, and the fun stuff of the airline business. Email me: [email protected]

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2 Comments

My husband is a captain for Mesaba Airlines. He also works in the training department as well as an APD. I’ve learned from him that Mesaba has never had a plane crash. Right now Mesaba is probably the safest airline out there. They have always had a very, very, very rigorous training department.

However, he is giving his last PC tomorrow since he is moving over to Delta. Mesaba is now owned by another airline. It’s kind of sad. He hopes the training department at Mesaba will not become a run-of-the-mill place when the other airline gets its hands on it.

The history of Mesaba airlines is an interesting one. At least I think so. In 1944

‘Mesaba Aviation, Inc. was founded by Gordy Newstrom in 1944 in Coleraine, Minnesota. The company first operated with a single J3 Cub airplane as a Fixed Base Operator, chartering flights and giving flying lessons. Mesaba Aviation took the name “mesaba” from the name of the geographic iron ore range in northern Minnesota. The word “mesaba” is the Native American word for “mighty eagle” and “giant of the hills.”‘

And now it may no longer be the strong, committed giant of the hills.

‘As it headed into the next century, Mesaba was a prominent regional airline poised for a bright future. Building on a 46 percent increase in air traffic and reportedly high consumer satisfaction, the company slogan announced: “Mesaba, An Airline To Call Your Own.” The carrier remained committed to quality service, leading edge technology, sound training protocol, and ongoing aircraft development and maintenance. Net income for fiscal 1999 was expected to reach $24.3 million on overall revenue of $348 million.’

My husband told me Mesaba was the bread basket for Northwest Airlines. I am nervous in thinking the new owner will unwittingly run it into the ground.

My husband is a captain for Mesaba Airlines. He also works in the training department as well as an APD. I’ve learned from him that Mesaba has never had a plane crash. Right now Mesaba is probably the safest airline out there. They have always had a very, very, very rigorous training department.

However, he is giving his last PC tomorrow since he is moving over to Delta. Mesaba is now owned by another airline. It’s kind of sad. He hopes the training department at Mesaba will not become a run-of-the-mill place when the other airline gets its hands on it.

The history of Mesaba airlines is an interesting one. At least I think so. In 1944

‘Mesaba Aviation, Inc. was founded by Gordy Newstrom in 1944 in Coleraine, Minnesota. The company first operated with a single J3 Cub airplane as a Fixed Base Operator, chartering flights and giving flying lessons. Mesaba Aviation took the name “mesaba” from the name of the geographic iron ore range in northern Minnesota. The word “mesaba” is the Native American word for “mighty eagle” and “giant of the hills.”‘

‘As it headed into the next century, Mesaba was a prominent regional airline poised for a bright future. Building on a 46 percent increase in air traffic and reportedly high consumer satisfaction, the company slogan announced: “Mesaba, An Airline To Call Your Own.” The carrier remained committed to quality service, leading edge technology, sound training protocol, and ongoing aircraft development and maintenance. Net income for fiscal 1999 was expected to reach $24.3 million on overall revenue of $348 million.’

My husband told me Mesaba was the bread basket for Northwest Airlines.

And now it may no longer be the strong, committed giant of the hills. I am nervous in thinking the new owner will unwittingly run it into the ground.

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