Browsing Tag: Lawsuit

A Northwest Airline's tail up in the far north, Alaska

A Northwest Airline's tail up in the far north, Alaska

The website GoNorthwest.com has been operating for the past ten years, providing travel information for the Pacific Northwestern part of the United States.

Northwest Airlines, which has recently been acquired by Delta Airlines feel they own the rights to the name. This started when site owner Jack High trademarked his name last year after someone stole his site’s contents and created an illegal copy under a similar name. High defends his actions stating he has no issue with any other company using the word, “northwest,” but is just concerned about protecting his own site.

Andrea James with the Seattle PI points out  that over 10,500 companies have “northwest” as part of their name, just in Washington state. There are also 366 trademarks that exist for “NW” and “Northwest” in the United States.

Delta Airlines commented  that “Northwest is a world-famous mark that is used by one of the oldest airlines in the world and that has been built with billions of dollars of investments over eight decades.”  The airline continued, stating they were concerned about the future of the site causing additional confusion of the brands. To me, this seems like a big company going a few steps too far. Here are some of my thoughts:

#1 The Northwest Airlines brand is going away. Delta is in the process of changing all their naming over to Delta. There won’t be any confusion in the future since the name will be gone soon. Why spend money on a dying brand?

#2 There is no record of people getting the two names confused.  Even searching for “Go Northwest” on Google, Northwest Airlines doesn’t show up.

#3 The look and feel of the two websites and what the companies offer GREATLY differ and it would be very hard for someone to mistake them.

#4 Should Delta go after all the companies that use the word “delta”? If one goes to GoDelta.com, it forwards you to a Delta marketing group (wow that font looks very similar). Should they be worried? How about Southwest Airlines or Alaska Airlines? When using a geographic location to name your business, you should expect there are going to be people that use part of your name in travel-related businesses.

#5  I don’t see how this is going to look good for Northwest Airlines and Delta Airlines. They should just back off now, it just isn’t worth the bad publicity.

#6  Sometimes the legal and moral lines aren’t so clear. Even if Northwest/Delta is shown to be legally right, does that make it right? Should a large, well established, world renowned airline be able to control how a very localized, small, travel website runs its business?

What are your thoughts on this? Is Northwest/Delta going too far or are they justified in protecting their brand?

Image: BobButcher
Southwest Boeing 737 winglet overlooking LA

Southwest Boeing 737 winglet overlooking LA

A 47 year old woman on a Southwest Airline’s flight from Florida to California ran into some trouble texting messaging someone while on her way to her seat.

She states that a flight attendant approached her and “rudely” told her to turn off her phone and buckle up. The woman states she totally complied and turned it off immediately and sat down. She continues saying the flight attendent returned and harassed her 6 more times before leaving the gate, not listening to her showing him that she turned off her phone.

He suposidly came back to her twice more while the plane was on its way to the runway and he decided to throw her off the plane. The flight was then returned to the gate, the woman was arrested, and the flight continued on.

Personally this seems like a bunch of hogwash and someone found a lawyer who likes publicity. First off a flight attendant can’t control what the plane does. The pilot would have to be informed of the situation and make the call to return to the gate. Then police are not going to just arrest this woman if she really did nothing wrong.

Of course Southwest Airlines is not commenting at this time, but I am sure they are looking forward to comment and set the story straight.

Source: Tennessean.com Image: Krobie