Browsing Tag: Boeing 747-8

The three Boeing 747-8 tails all lined up

The three Boeing 747-8 tails all lined up

Last Saturday, I decided to drive around Paine Field located in Everett, WA. I have done it before, but not since I started my blog. I wanted to see what planes I could see and how close I could get before hitting a fence. I was quite surprised with some of the views I found.

I took my camera and iPhone along and took pictures and thought you might be interested in what I saw:

* Great angle to see all three Boeing 747-8 tails lined up
* The first Boeing 727 with old United Airlines livery
* Two Eva Airlines Boeing 777’s
* Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 in special retro livery

The best part, it was all free and anyone can access all the areas I went. The day was gray and rainy, but well worth it. Turns out a Twitter follower, Kevin (@TxAgFlyer), followed the same path on Sunday and got some pretty nice pictures with the sky being blue and purple, instead of gray.

CHECK OUT ALL OF MY FLICKR PHOTOS

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Two Boeing 747-8's at Paine Field on Saturday.

Two Boeing 747-8's at Paine Field on Saturday.

This Saturday I was at KPAE (where the Boeing 747-8 is built) and saw one of the jets with its strobes on, doing testing.

To most, seeing two jets sit there and only one with strobes on might not be the most exciting thing, but to me it was awesome. It is a great sign for the things to come, hopefully very shortly.

Liz Matzelle was able to get quite a few great pics of the Boeing 747-8’s and Matt Cawby caught a video with the strobes going on his KPAE Paine Field Blog.

Matzelle also caught a picture of Boeing re-painting registration numbers on one of the Boeing 747-8’s. Boeing had accidentally painted the same registration number (N747EX) on both aircraft. Hey if that is the only thing that goes wrong — I am ok with that!

Flight Blogger points out the Boeing 747-8 to fly first (RC501) is the 1420th 747 that Boeing has built since 1966. Hopefully we will see RC501 completing taxi tests later this week and a having her first flight as early as January 31st.

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Digital image of the Boeing 747-8 from Boeing's NewPlane.com

Digital image of the Boeing 747-8 from Boeing's NewPlane.com

The Boeing 747-8 is just a few weeks away from taking off for the first time. Before the plane goes into service, the FAA wants to make certain the plane’s computer systems cannot be hacked. Even though this sounds like the makings of a summer blockbuster movie, the FAA and Boeing want to make sure it can’t become a reality.

The FAA states the Boeing 747-7, “will have novel or unusual design features associated with the architecture and connectivity capabilities of the airplane’s computer systems and networks, which may allow access to external computer systems and networks”.

With passengers being able to access on board internet and in flight entertainment systems, there is a chance someone could cause harm to the aircraft’s computer systems. The FAA requested similar precautions for the Boeing 787 as well.

By the time the 747-8 can fly passengers:

* Boeing must ensure electronic system security protection for the aircraft control domain and airline information domain from access by unauthorized sources external to the airplane, including those possibly caused by maintenance activity.
* Boeing must ensure that electronic system security threats from external sources are identified and assessed, and that effective electronic system security protection strategies are implemented to protect the airplane from all adverse impacts on safety, functionality, and continued airworthiness.

Vijay Takanit, a vice-president for Exostar which provides airline security solution stated points out that most of what happens for passengers and for pilots are disconnected, but there is some crossover. “The passenger equipment, the equipment that is actually providing service in the cabin, is completely segregated from what is providing services in the cockpit. But there is some crossover and [the industry] is trying very hard to make sure the number of crossover points are very limited.”

Find out more information at Mary Kirby’s Runway Girl blog.

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