Around the World

Miles flown for stories
2014: 360,327
2013: 330,818

Takeaways from the NTSB Asiana 214 Report

Photo of the Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 flight 214 crash from the NTSB.

Asiana Airlines flight 214 crash, a Boeing 777 – Photo: NTSB

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) this week released a synopsis of their final report on last year’s crash of Asiana Airlines flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport (SFO).  The report lists NTSB’s findings, identifies a probable cause, and makes 27 specific recommendations to Asiana, the FAA, and Boeing – among others.  The crash was found to be pilot error – the result of a botched visual approach which culminated in the Boeing 777-200ER hitting a seawall and crashing onto the runway, killing three and seriously injuring dozens.

For anyone who has followed the crash investigation, there were no real surprises in the report. However, there are some interesting takeaways.

Continue reading Takeaways from the NTSB Asiana 214 Report

Comparing and Contrasting ANA’s Three Business Class Products

The ANA Business Staggered Seat.  This is the "C" seat with the storage window side giving true Aisle access.  Chose "A" if you love a true window seat - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

The ANA Business Staggered Seat. This is the “C” seat with the storage window side giving true Aisle access. Chose “A” if you love a true window seat.

During my ANA Ambassador trip, I was given the chance to fly three different types of All Nippon Airways (ANA) Business Class seats and I wanted to share my thoughts on them. For my story, I will be concentrating mostly on the hard product (the seat) vs the “soft” product (meals, service, amenities), which is common across all the aircraft.

The current generation of Business Class seats are fitted to ANA’s 787 as part of the Inspiration of Japan series. There are two different versions: international and domestic. The long haul (international) 787 seats are called “Business Staggered” and are similar to a small pod. This is currently the airline’s premium product. The seats lie fully flat and, with a length of over 6ft, allows passengers to easily get some rest. The Business Staggered seats can also be found in some of ANA’s 777s (though the 777 version is slightly larger).

Continue reading Comparing and Contrasting ANA’s Three Business Class Products

Photos: American 777-300ER and Saudia Cargo 747-8F at Paine Field

An American Airlines 777-300ER on approach to Paine Field in Everett - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

An American Airlines 777-300ER on approach to Paine Field in Everett – Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

I don’t know about other AvGeeks & plane spotters out there but I have this list of aircraft that I have been trying to get photos of lately.  Well it sure was a lucky day in Everett when I can tick two off the list in the span of a few minutes.

What is on my list?  First, I hope to get each airline that operates the Boeing 787s (because some of the liveries are just downright pretty) and also every airline that operates to Australia (where I am from). Other than that, my list is pretty much made up of  airlines that I feel good looking schemes or ones that I haven’t seen before.  The holy grail’s though are the special schemes and the retro liveries.

A Saudia Cargo 747-8F About to turn onto 16R at Paine Field - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

A Saudia Cargo 747-8F about to turn onto 16R at Paine Field – Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

The four that have eluded me lately up at Everett had been the American Airlines new Livery, Aeroflot’s 777-300ER, Saudia Cargo 747-8F and the Uzbekistan Airlines 767.  When I saw on the Saturday morning that the American 777 was doing a test flight, well you can bet where I was headed.  Even though the fog was thick in the morning for the takeoff, I ran some errands and came back for the departure.  When the sun had burnt away the fog and it was a glorious looking afternoon.

To make the afternoon even better, as the American 777 came onto its final approach, the Saudia Cargo 747-8F got taxi clearances for the test flight it was about to begin… score!

An American Airlines 777 in the New Livery Touches down as a Saudia Cargo 747-8F taxi's by  - Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

An American Airlines 777 in the New Livery Touches down as a Saudia Cargo 747-8F taxi’s by – Photo: Mal Muir | AirlineReporter.com

Even though some of the photos were not perfect, it doesn’t matter.  It’s about getting out and enjoying the sunshine, seeing the aircraft and chatting with fellow AvGeeks.  Here is to a fruitful spring and summer of spotting!

MORE SEATTLE 2013 SPOTTING PHOTOS

This story written by…Malcolm Muir, Lead Correspondent.

Mal is an Australian Avgeek now living and working in Seattle. With a passion for aircraft photography, traveling and the fun that combining the two can bring. Insights into the aviation world with a bit of a perspective thanks to working in the travel industry.

@BigMalX | BigMal’s World | Photos

PHOTOS: Aeroflot’s Livery on their First Boeing 777-300ER + Virtual Interior Tour

Aeroflot's first Boeing 777-300ER arrives back to Paine Field in Everett, WA after being painted in Portland. Image by Bernie Leighton.

Aeroflot’s first Boeing 777-300ER arrives back to Paine Field in Everett, WA on January 2, 2013 after being painted in Portland. Image by Bernie Leighton.

To help modernize their fleet, Aeroflot has already placed an order for 16 Boeing 777-300ERs. Their first 77W recently flew to Portland to get painted and flew back to Paine Field in full Aeroflot livery yesterday.

Russell Hill (@Sabian404) was able to catch the 777 down in Portland (PDX) and Bernie Leighton (@Powertothethird) was at Paine Field (KPAE) to watch it land. I think the aircraft, with the Aeroflot livery, is so beautiful, I had to share the photos.

Aeroflot's first 77W leaving Portland (PDX) after being painted. Photo by Russell Hill.

Aeroflot’s first 77W leaving Portland (PDX) after being painted. Photo by Russell Hill.

Back in June 2011 Vitaly Saveliev, director general of Aeroflot Russian Airlines stated, “The Boeing 777 will strengthen our long-haul capabilities. These airplanes will play a critical role in our network expansion strategy, particularly the international growth opportunities we expect from our joint businesses with SkyTeam partners when servicing the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games and the 2018 Football World Cup.”

Aeroflots's Boeing 777 arrives to PDX on December 14th to be painted. Photo by Russell Hill.

Aeroflots’s Boeing 777 arrives to PDX on December 14th to be painted. Photo by Russell Hill.

Aeroflot is set to configure their 777-300ERs with a total of 402 seats. There will be 30 seats in business set up with a 2-2-2 layout, 48 premium economy configured with 2-4-2 and finally 324 seats in economy with 10-seats abreast as 3-4-3.

BONUS: Aeroflot to show off retro livery on an Airbus A320 in 2013

I am working to try to get actual hi-res computer images of Aeroflot’s interior, but for now I have pulled some screen shots of a video that they posted back in October:

What Aeroflot's Business Class in the Boeing 777-300ER is set to look like. Image from Aeroflot.

What Aeroflot’s Business Class in the Boeing 777-300ER is set to look like. Image from Aeroflot / YouTube.

Premium Economy has noticable additional space vs standard economy. Image from Aeroflot.

Premium Economy has noticeably additional space vs standard economy. Image from Aeroflot / YouTube.

Not as nice as the front of the aircraft, here is Aeroflot's economy section with 10-abreast seating. Image from Aeroflot.

Not as nice as the front of the aircraft, here is Aeroflot’s economy section with 10-abreast seating. Image from Aeroflot / YouTube.

This story written by…

David Parker Brown, Editor & Founder.David started AirlineReporter.com in the summer of 2008, but has had a passion for aviation since he was a kid. Born and raised in the Seattle area (where he is currently based) has surely had an influence and he couldn’t imagine living anywhere else in the world.

@AirlineReporter | Flickr | YouTube

Flying Like a Boss in Air New Zealand’s Business Premier Seat

A glorious grey sky in London.

A glorious grey sky in London.

AIR NEW ZEALAND BUSINESS PREMIERE REVIEW BASICS

Airline: Air New Zealand
Aircraft: Boeing 777-300ER
Departed:  London’s Heathrow Airport (LHR)
Arrived: Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)
Stops: Non-stop flight
Class: Business Premiere
Seat: 1J (right center aisle)
Length: 10.5 hours

Cheers: The fact that I slept through most of the flight is probably one of the best reviews possible.
Jeers: I want to see out the window.
Bottom Line: It is confusing to figure out if this really is a Business product or First Class.

The "window" seats face away from the window, which isn't so great for AvGeeks, but does provide more privacy.

The “window” seats face away from the window, which isn’t so great for AvGeeks, but does provide more privacy.

Earlier, I posted my experience flying Air New Zealand’s Premium Economy from LAX to LHR. I was impressed with the product and was looking forward to how their Business Premium would compare (note: the airline covered my airfare and I paid the taxes). There are many similarities between Premium Economy and Business Premiere, but there are also key differences. Both can check-in at a priority line, get free alcoholic beverages and priority boarding. The extra money spent to upgrade will get you lounge access, premium wines on board, additional food options, a larger screen (10.6″ vs 12.1″) and a fold flat bed.

This was actually my second flight on Air New Zealand’s Business Premier, but only my first “real” one. My previous experience was taking the airline’s first Boeing 777-300ER from Paine Field down to Los Angeles, which was only a 2.5hr media flight. I was happy to try out the product in a “real world” situation and I had a good 10.5 hours to do it. Are the extra features and product worth the ticket premium (or miles)? I think it depends on how you want your flight experience to go.

Each seat has quite a bit of privacy for its occupants.

Each seat has quite a bit of privacy for its occupants.

When first walking into the cabin, it is obvious that the Business Premier class is an upgrade. Instead of a 2-2-2 layout in Premium Economy, Business gives you a 1-2-1 layout, but really it feels more like a 1-1-1-1 set up since you are so isolated.

If you are traveling with someone else, you won’t be able to easily interact while sitting in your seat, but have no worries. The seats easily allow two people to sit and talk at the same seat. This isolation also gives every passenger access to the aisle, which means you don’t have to crawl over someone while they sleep to use the bathroom.

Each of the seats is angled to give passengers extra privacy. The biggest downside is not being able to look out the window with ease. Where the Premium Economy seat actually tilts you towards the window, the Business Premier tilts you away. Although I enjoy looking out the window, I much rather have the privacy and space, since the windows are shut after take off anyhow.

A larger laptop on the tray table gets in the way of the entertainment screen.

A larger laptop on the tray table gets in the way of the entertainment screen.

Now, the purpose of my flight was to check out the product, but I ran into a big problem… I fell asleep… for over six hours. That might be one of the best compliments when reviewing an airline’s product, right?

At first I was a bit confused about the seat. I kept hitting the recline button, but the seat would only recline so far. Turns out, it is one of those seats where you have to get up and fold down the bed. What a great Airline Reporter I am, not paying attention and thinking my seat was broken for a few minutes — oh well.

Yes, it takes a bit more of an effort to convert your seat into a bed, but I think it ends up being worth it. Once you have your seat folded forward, you are able to put a memory foam mattress on top. Then add the fluffy duvet and full size pillows and you are ready for a good night’s (or day’s) sleep. If you have any trouble or want some help, just hit the call button and the flight attendants will have no problem assisting.

I had plenty of room to roll around and get into multiple positions. If needed, I was given an eye mask to block out the light, but I didn’t need it. The soft glow of pink lighting was perfect for setting a sleeping mood.

This broke a record for me, since previously, the longest I have slept on a flight was four hours straight. I wasn’t even that jet-lagged, since I had a week in London and was more or less caught up on sleep. Oh well. That still gave me four hours to check out the product, food and drinks.

My dinner starter: prawns. I think I am watching Up in the Air here.

My dinner starter: prawns. I think I am watching Up in the Air here.

The meal service started shortly after take off (and before I went to sleep). I decided to watch the movie, Up in the Air (it seemed appropriate) and enjoy my meal. I started with coconut prawns with rice noodles and plum sugar dressing. Then I had a choice between lamb, salmon, chicken or eggplant. I decided to go with the lamb that was on cabbage and potato mash with field mushrooms and minted yoghurt. All amazing.

Then I finished it off with a little vanilla and chocolate ice cream. On my previously flight, dessert was served with the appetizer, which was a bit odd for me, but this time, it came after the meal with some dessert wine.

When I woke up, the cabin was still in sleep-mode and I was thirsty. I was able to fire up the ‘ol in-flight entertainment system and order from a nice selection of food and drinks. I decided on some Diet Coke and sparkling water. The cool part is I was able to customize how my drink was served. Why, yes, I will take ice in both and a lemon wedge in my water. Less than a minute later, my drinks were delivered.

Near the end of the flight, we were served a second meal, which was quite a bit lighter. I had a choice of smoothie, fruit, wraps or scones.

Ordering additional drinks or food during non-meal service is quick and easy.

Ordering additional drinks or food during non-meal service is quick and easy.

When I received my ticket to fly, the Business Premiere section was filled. I was hoping to get a window seat, but there were none left. Even after checking multiple times before the flight and again at check-in, there were still no other seats. I would have preferred not sitting in the first row, since many times, when my feet were up, the curtain would hit them anytime anyone passed.

So, is upgrading to Business Premiere worth the additional money over Premium Economy? Well, that depends. If you need to sleep well, there is no question that it is worth more. However, if your game plan is to stay up the entire flight and maybe talk to the person next to you, then maybe Premium Economy will do what you need.

But the fact that on average, Business Premiere seats cost $4000-5000 and Premium Economy cost $2000-$2500, that is not a bad deal. Especially when you compare these products to other international seats that cost much more. If you are a person who has the ability to either pay or use miles to upgrade to the front of the plane, it will be hard to find an upgrade per dollar that gives you this good of a deal.

ADDITIONAL PHOTOS OF AIR NEW ZEALAND’S BUSINESS CLASS: