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2014: 243,450
2013: 330,818

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ANA Unveils Special 60th Birthday Livery on Boeing 767

ANA's special 60th anniversary livery on a Boeing 767 model. Photo from ANA.

ANA’s special 60th anniversary livery on a Boeing 767 model. Photo from ANA.

Back in September I shared a special livery contest that All Nippon Airways (ANA) was holding for people to design a special livery to celebrate their 60th birthday. Shockingly, my design was not chosen.

After 7042 designs were submitted, the airline chose their top ten choices, where fans could vote on their favorite. The votes were tallied and the winning design was one from the 19 and over group seen on a 767-300 model above. The design was changed a little bit from the original design to make sure it would work on an actual aircraft (notice the bird and flower swapped). Anyone else have “it’s a small world,” playing in their head right now?

The new design is expected to join the fleet in February 2013.

This story written by…

David Parker Brown, Editor & Founder. David started AirlineReporter.com in the summer of 2008, but has had a passion for aviation since he was a kid. Born and raised in the Seattle area (where he is currently based) has surely had an influence and he couldn’t imagine living anywhere else in the world.

@AirlineReporter | Flickr | YouTube

Airline Livery of the Week- Tiara Air’s Colorful Aruba Boeing 737

Tiara Air’s Boeing 737-300. Photo courtesy of Tiara Air.

I think more airlines should be named after the kids of their founders. Imagine how much more personal an airline like American would be if it had a name like “Nicole Airlines.”

Tiara Air, based at Queen Beatrix International Airport in Aruba, was founded by Alejandro Muyale and named for his daughter Tiara Muyale. Tiara (the airline) flies to locations in the Carribean and South America, with newly added routs to Caracas, Maracaibo, Fort Lauderdale and St. Maarten. Yes, U.S. citizens, that means Tiara can now make your Aruba dreams come true!

The airline flies two Short 360 twin-engine turboprop aircraft and the Boeing 737-300 seen here.

The livery on this plane is somewhat predictable, though festive. Yellow and blue cheatlines run down the length of the fuselage, with the word “Aruba” and a red star slapped, somewhat awkwardly, onto the forward section. It looks cool, and leaves no question as to the destination of the plane. The blue tail includes the company logo and, what else, a tiara.

What do you think of Tiara Air’s livery on its 737-300?

This story written by…Travis Griffith.Travis is a published author and professional writer who believes in driving fast, flying high and living today like there’s no tomorrow. Automobiles, aviation and travel top the long list of his varied interests.

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Image: Icelandair Commits to Purchasing 12 Boeing 737 MAX Aircraft

Boeing illustration showing what the Boeing 737 MAX will look like with Icelandair livery.

Boeing illustration showing what the Boeing 737 MAX will look like with Icelandair livery.

Boeing and Icelandair announced a commitment today for 12 MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft. Currently, the airline only operates the Boeing 757, with a fleet of 23.

“This commitment is the result of our research into what aircraft manufacturers have on offer to help us strengthen and grow our fleet and our network towards the future,” said Bjorgolfur Johannsson, Icelandair Group president and CEO. “We have had a successful relationship with Boeing for decades and we are pleased to continue our cooperation for years to come.”

It appears that the airline will not be replacing their 757 fleet (although some of the older 757s will likely be rotated out of service) with the 737 MAX, but supplementing it.

Icelandair currenlty only operates the Boeing 757. Image by: Daniel Jones / djlpbb40.

Icelandair currently only operates the Boeing 757. Image by: Daniel Jones / djlpbb40.

“Over the past decades, Icelandair has successfully utilized its all-Boeing 757 fleet to establish its Reykjavik-based hub as an important gateway between Europe and North America,” said Todd Nelp, vice president of European Sales, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “The introduction of the 737 MAX to Icelandair’s operation will complement its existing 757 fleet and ensure the carrier’s continued expansion across both continents, offering significant fuel saving with unrivaled passenger comfort.”

The Icelandair livery has always looked quite impressive on the Boeing 757 and I feel almost equally so on the MAX. One has to love those yellow nacelles.

This story written by…

David Parker Brown, Editor & Founder. David started AirlineReporter.com in the summer of 2008, but has had a passion for aviation since he was a kid. Born and raised in the Seattle area (where he is currently based) has surely had an influence and he couldn’t imagine living anywhere else in the world.

@AirlineReporter | Flickr | YouTube

United 787 Flight 1146 Diverts to New Orleans Mid Flight

United Airlines First 787 at Paine Field in Everett. Phone: Mal Muir – Airlinereporter.com

On Tuesday the 4th December 2012, United flight 1146 scheduled from Houston to Newark, diverted to New Orleans due to a mechanical issue.  An emergency had been declared during descent and following standard procedure, the flight was to be welcomed by emergency crews upon landing.

As they approached the airport, there was talk between the tower controllers and the crew on board that would indicate they had predicted there might be an electrical problem.  Recordings taken from LiveATC (thanks to NYCAviation for the transcript) indicate the crew were forwarding instruction for the ground crews to help them inspect the aircraft upon landing:

UA 1146: If in fact anything’s going on it’ll be the area right behind the wings, the rear of the wings back to the third door on each side.
Tower: Which wing?
UA 1146: Uh, we don’t know. Either one. It might be on either side. But it’s behind the wing where high load electrical stuff is and back to the rear cargo. But we don’t anticipate anything, that’s just where he needs to be.
Tower: Okay.
UA 1146: So following us would be perfect.

The Dreamliner landed safely and all 184 passengers & crew on-board were unharmed.  The unexpected arrival marked the first Boeing 787 to land at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.  United re-booked passengers on another aircraft and set out to work with Boeing to investigate the issue.

United Airlines First Boeing 787 on Launch Day at the Boeing Factory in Everett. Phone: Mal Muir airlinereporter.com

United Spokesperson Christen Davis confirms to AirlineReporter.com that the maintenance inspection of the 787 that diverted to New Orleans (N26902 the latest of their their 787s)  revealed that one of the six electrical generators on the aircraft failed and that back up systems allowed it to be powered by the remaining five.  United will replace the generator, run additional checks and then return the aircraft to service as soon as possible.

United also confirmed that this diversion was unrelated to the latest FAA Airworthiness Directive to all 787 operators that required mandatory inspections to the fuel feed systems.  The FAA implemented these mandatory checks this week, which had already been recommended by Boeing.  United’s 787s have already undergone the inspections for the fuel systems & Davis confirmed that United would continue to work closely with Boeing and the FAA to determine what went wrong with flight 1146.

This story written by…Malcolm Muir, Lead Correspondent.Mal is an Australian Avgeek now living and working in Seattle. With a passion for aircraft photography, traveling and the fun that combining the two can bring. Insights into the aviation world with a bit of a perspective thanks to working in the travel industry.

@BigMalX | BigMal’s World | Photos

Delivering Qatar Airway’s First Boeing 787 Dreamliner – PART 3

The wing is astounding on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. Photo: Malcolm Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

The wing is astounding on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. Photo: Malcolm Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

This is the final installment of a multi-part (PART 1 & PART 2) series was written by AirlineReporter.com correspondent Mal Muir on the Qatar Airways Boeing 787 Dreamliner delivery flight (note: Qatar Airways covered Malcolm’s trip to Doha to cover this story).

With the flight now well and truly underway, most of the passengers on board were sleeping, but I remained not able to sleep. This is not because of the 787 Dreamliner; I have a history of not being able to sleep on aircraft. This meant that I had plenty of time to explore the plane, get in some work, have a chance to relax, and still fit in a few movies.

Having the on board Wi-Fi meant that I was able handle all of those emails I had been avoiding. For those on a business trip, Wi-Fi allows you to stay connected to the office and remain productive (maybe that is not always a good thing).  It also works out if you are a Twitter fanatic, so  you do not feel disconnected from the Twitterverse.

What is better than being on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner? Being able to tell all your friends via the internet while flying at 30,000 feet. Photo: Malcolm Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

What is better than being on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner? Being able to tell all your friends via the internet while flying at 30,000 feet. Photo: Malcolm Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

The extra-large windows were a godsend for those in the back during the flight. As we passed over Iceland they managed to get 2.5 hours of uninterrupted viewing of the Northern Lights.  Unfortunately those of us up the front totally missed out since our windows were blacked out — I guess there are some benefits to flying economy.

When there was no outside light-show,  I was able to check out the economy section during flight and tested out the Recaro seats.  The Seats in the Economy Cabin were comfortable enough and would be fine for the medium length flights this Aircraft was fitted out for.  With a leather cover on the neck rest, they felt luxurious while not being to hard or uncomfortable, as some leather cushions can be.  I was also able to see the Social Media Command center set up as Qatar Airways was live tweeting their way across the globe.

The business cabin is prepared to start our way into Doha after a long journey. Photo: Mal Muri / AirlineReporter.com.

The business cabin is prepared to start our way into Doha after a long journey. Photo: Mal Muri / AirlineReporter.com.

Unfortunately I wasn’t able to get any face time with the CEO, Akbar Al Baker, who was on board our flight. He was able to take advantage of the comfy seats and slept most of his way to Doha. I have it say it was surreal seeing  the CEO of the airline in the Business Class PJ’s.

As we crossed over Eastern Europe, heading towards Turkey and the Middle East, passengers started to wake up and the cabin crew started serving breakfast with freshly made espresso (not that I hadn’t stopped eating — I had a midnight snack as well).

Flying over Doha -- about to land. Photo: Mal Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

Flying over Doha — about to land. Photo: Mal Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

As we approached Doha, we prepared for our arrival. The flight was long, but many of us did not want the flight to end. Even though I got no sleep on the 14 hour flight, I felt oddly ready to go. It could have been the adrenaline and excitement, but could also have to do with the Dreamliner itself. The 787 has a new climate control system on board where the cabin is pressurized and humidified at a lower altitude, which allows you to feel more refreshed. I wasn’t fully able to appreciate the difference until my Boeing 777 flight home a few days later (I will be sharing a 787 vs 777 story later).

We started our descent into Doha and as the airport came into view, it was truly a sight to behold.  The blue waters of the Gulf, the yellow of the desert and just the small buildings and everything dotting the landscape.  It was unlike anything I had ever seen before — and I have seen quite a bit.

Welcome to Doha. Image: Malcolm Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

Welcome to Doha. Image: Malcolm Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

After we touched down at Doha International Airport we taxied towards the ministerial lounge (currently used for heads of state when they depart and the Amir of Qatar). The taxi ways and other areas of the airport were just full of Qatar Airways and other airport staff, all wanting to welcome the Dreamliner.

Even though we did not get a traditional water cannon salute on arrival, this was still a big deal with over 2 busloads of media waiting for us on arrival with big TV screens to show the aircraft landing.  As we disembarked and headed into the lounge area another press conference was underway by the CEO of the airline and the local representative for Boeing.

It was a long, yet fun journey to get to Doha. Photo: Mal Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

It was a long, yet fun journey to get to Doha. Photo: Mal Muir / AirlineReporter.com.

Once the press conference was over, the local media were given access to the aircraft while those of us on the flight, were bussed over to the arrivals terminal so that we could clear immigration, customs and get over to our hotel for the evening to get some sleep (at least for those of us who can not sleep well on planes).

The 787 flight was a once in a lifetime experience. It showcased that you can merge cutting edge technologies both in the on board experience and in the hardware of the aircraft itself to bring a truly magnificent piece of aircraft into the sky. I had a few days to explore Doha before my flight home and I look forward to share the rest of my adventures with Qatar Airways in the upcoming weeks.

ALL THE QATAR AIRWAYS BOEING 787 DELIVERY PHOTOS:

This story written by…Malcolm Muir, Lead Correspondent. Mal is an Australian Avgeek now living and working in Seattle. With a passion for aircraft photography, traveling and the fun that combining the two can bring. Insights into the aviation world with a bit of a perspective thanks to working in the travel industry.

@BigMalX | BigMal’s World | Photos